Monthly Archives: December 2017


How to boot Windows 10 into Recovery Mode

It’s very easy to boot a Windows 10 machine into the Recovery Mode. Yust power on the Windows 10 machine and wait for the login screen. Hold down the Left Shift and choose the restart option (hit the Power icon at the bottom right)

Windows 10 Recovery Boot

So choose the restart option and after a couple of seconds you notice that you’re booted into the Recovery Mode :

Recovery Mode 1

Recovery Mode 2

Now you are ready to restore a system image (see previous post) or go to safe mode or command prompt.


How to quickly create a Windows 10 Image in VHD format

For testing purposes I quickly wanted to create a master image using a VHD file. The Master VM was running on VMware so I decided to use the Windows 10 built-in functionality. Just run the sdclt.exe command with administrator privileges.  (This was introduced some time ago with Windows Vista).

sdclt

Create System Image

Confirm your backup settings:

Confirm System Image

Sleect the Create System Image function and specify a location where you wish to store the VHD file. In this example I use a network location. Follow the default options and wait a couple of minutes. At the network location I just specified there is now the VHD file present.

Note : You can use this file also when you boot in the Windows Recovery Environment.

Windows System Recovery

(Choose System Image Recovery and point to your created VHD image)


How to export your Windows 10 product key

The product key for new computers that come preinstalled with Windows 10 has the product key stored within the motherboard firmware. Users can retrieve it by issuing a command from the command prompt.

  1. Press Windows key + X
  2. Click Command Prompt (Admin)
  3. At the command prompt, type wmic path SoftwareLicensingService get OA3xOriginalProductKey

This will reveal the product key.

Windows 10 Key


How to configure PFsense to PXE boot using FOGProject

For testing purposes I’m using PFsense to allow my clients to PXE boot using the FOG TFTP server.

This are the settings which are working :

PropertyValue
Next serverIP Address of FOG Server
Default BIOS file nameundionly.kpxe
UEFI 32 bit file nameipxe32.efi
UEFI 64 bit file nameipxe.efi

 

You can find these settings in the PFsense DHCP service menu.


Recommended Quest Virtual Appliance specifications (K1000)

The K1000 Virtual Appliance is configured, by default, to utilize 2 vCPUs and 4 GB of memory (this is also the minimum system requirement for the K1000). However, this minimum specification is only designed for the average customer up to 1000 managed devices. For larger implementations, more resources are required.

This chart below lists the recommended vCPU, RAM and NIC specifications based on managed device count (i.e. client systems with a K1000 agent installed). This is only a general guideline, as the results can vary widely based on how the K1000 is configured. It’s possible to have less then 1000 managed devices, for example, and require more than 4 GB of memory. Details about the K1000’s performance are available in Settings > Logs, then click System Performance in the drop-down menu.

Managed Device CountRecommended VM ResourcesNetwork interface
0 - 10002 vCPU & 4 GB RAM1 Gigabit
1000 - 20004 vCPU & 8 GB RAM1 Gigabit
2000 - 40008 vCPU & 16 GB RAM1 Gigabit
4000 - 800016 vCPU & 32 GB RAM1 Gigabit
8000 - 1600024 vCPU & 64 GB RAM10 Gigabit