IT


PatchMyPC to the rescue!

Recently I looked into PatchMyPC for Microsoft SCCM purposes (more info about that in another blog post). But I found out that the Home Edition of PatchMyPC did a hell of a job also!

This version is free to download and use and it instantly updates all your installed programs like Notepad++, Winrar etc.

PatchMyPCHome

The program supports hundreds of programs. Great tip: selecting a program you currently have not installed automatically installs that program (latest version!) for you!

I found this tool a great addition to keeping my device updated!

More info here


Ignite 2018 by Tony Krijnen

Wil je weten wat je hebt gemist van Ignite? Tony Krijnen van Microsoft praat je bij in deze TechCast van LogIn!

Deze alweer 7e extra TechCast gaat over de nieuwste ontwikkelingen die zijn gepresenteerd op Microsoft Ignite 2018. Tony Krijnen, IoT technologie strateeg bij Microsoft, bezocht dit mega tech-event in Orlando USA en praat Sander Noordijk en Eric van Klaveren bij over wat hem opviel. Hij vertelt over wat er vanuit Microsoft zit aan te komen en welke sessies zijn de moeite waard om terug te kijken.


How to fix Remote Desktop DPI scaling with high resolution laptops

More and more laptops are equipped with high-resolution screens, like the Microsoft Surfaces and (in my case) the Dell XPS devices. Do you also have a very high-resolution display on your laptop like I do? And is everything too small to see within your Remote Desktop Connection, I found the following solution very useful.

This issue is caused by lack of not being DPI scaling aware of the Remote Desktop Client. If you open a Remote Desktop connection to a server or other computer the native resolution of the computer is used instead of the scaling to 1920×1080, so you’ll get very small icons etc. There are (Remote Desktop/Management) tools available who seems to fix this issue also. But I was looking for a solution that works with my current mstsc.exe. The solution is to create a manifest file. A manifest file is a (XML) configuration file to configure special settings, in this case for mstsc.exe. Follow the steps below :

First, tell Windows to look for a manifest file for an application by default. This can be done by setting a registry entry.

Open regedit and navigate to the registry key:
HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\SideBySide
Right-click, select NEW -> DWORD (32 bit) Value
Type PreferExternalManifest and then press ENTER.
Right-click PreferExternalManifest, and then click Modify.
Enter Value Data 1 and select Decimal.
Click OK. Exit Registry Editor.

Next step is to make the manifest file, mstsc.exe.manifest. Copy the contents below and put it in Notepad or similar tool and save it to a file as %SystemRoot%\System32\mstsc.exe.manifest. Download of the file is also available, here. Important is that you save the file in the same directory as the Remote Desktop Client executable (mstsc.exe).

You can also copy/paste the following code into the manifest file :

There are a couple of things you have to keep in mind. The mouse pointer still stays small. I found this not so big an issue and still haven’t found a workaround for this. I’ve heard that updates like Microsoft 1709 overwrites the manifest file. So you have to re-apply the manifest file. I’ve also noticed that the warning do you trust this certificate warning doesn’t appear any longer 🙂

 


How to boot Windows 10 into Recovery Mode

It’s very easy to boot a Windows 10 machine into the Recovery Mode. Yust power on the Windows 10 machine and wait for the login screen. Hold down the Left Shift and choose the restart option (hit the Power icon at the bottom right)

Windows 10 Recovery Boot

So choose the restart option and after a couple of seconds you notice that you’re booted into the Recovery Mode :

Recovery Mode 1

Recovery Mode 2

Now you are ready to restore a system image (see previous post) or go to safe mode or command prompt.


How to export your Windows 10 product key

The product key for new computers that come preinstalled with Windows 10 has the product key stored within the motherboard firmware. Users can retrieve it by issuing a command from the command prompt.

  1. Press Windows key + X
  2. Click Command Prompt (Admin)
  3. At the command prompt, type wmic path SoftwareLicensingService get OA3xOriginalProductKey

This will reveal the product key.

Windows 10 Key


Quick tip : How to check which other websites are sharing your (VPS/Web) server 1

Many people make use of VPS servers of providers like TransIP and GoDaddy.com

Often I hear people complain about the performance of their (web) server of Blog. Often this is due to overcomittment of the virtualization platform that the provider is using. Many websites have little to none traffic and at peak times the performance is not that great. (Keep in mind the price differences between hosting providers!) Don’t expect great performance when you use a $3/month WordPress website. Often those servers are heavily overcommitted.

You can check this very easily by using reverse DNS. An easy to use website is yougetsignal. Just fill in your (or any other) domainname and hit check. You instantly see which other websites are using the same public Internet IP Address. You see >30 other questionable websites??? Don’t expect top performance…

yougetsignal


Combine Plesk and New Relic to monitor your server(s) running your Blog (for free!)

I use Plesk for management of my web servers. It saves me a lot of time and makes managing several (Linux) web servers a piece of cake. Those web servers are running on virtual servers and I wanted an overview of the usage and the performance. I decided to use the API’s of New Relic because I already had a great experience and noticed that there was a Plesk extension for it.

Installing the extension is very easy. Go to extensions and add the New Relic – Application Performance Extension

Now click on the Extension New Relic to configure it. Open a extra tab in your browser and sign up for a free New Relic account here. (I prefer to use Google Chrome, it works beter)

After creating your account. You need 3 things, 2 of those you can find in the New Relic interface. First is the Account Number. You can find that in the browser:

That is the number between accounts/ and /applications.

The second is the API key. Go to Account settings:

And find your API key below:

Now go back to your other tab and let’s configure the New Relic extension. You notice the following screen:

First is the license key (step 2), the server name is the name of your server (of something to identify it) and the account ID is the number you wrote down. Choose to install Servers (this will install the appropriate client on the server for monitoring purposes) and click ok.

After some time, go to the New Relic tab, choose the servers menu and notice your server!

You notice the green square. Your server is in a healthy state. You notice the CPU, memory and disk statistics. Now let’s click on your server.

Wow! In one single overview you have all the necessary information you need. Is your website performing badly? At what time? Was it the CPU or memory?

Notice the Processes, Network and Disks tabs. Clicking on those you can easily find more information what is causing possibly a problem on your server(s)

Conclusion

When you are using Plesk for management for your server, the New Relic extension is a great way to monitor your servers. It’s very easy to configure and it gives you lot of information. You can use all the server features at no costs! All of the above is free and you receive no commercials or SPAM.